Interoperability in Healthcare using Open Standards

The emerging major overhaul to the Healthcare system, aided by Value Based Healthcare and Outcome Measurement, is inevitable and that’s is good!

The outstanding question is how do we infuse Sensemaking in the future Healthcare realm?

The cues for a better interopable worldview is nothing new. The main obstacles and roadblocks could be narrowed down to the following: closed-down data and information silos, with no governanace and policy making that apply the open innovation paradigm. This is the first post in a series unpacking interoperability in the healthcare system.

Open Standards – the remedy for the Healthcare systems incurable prognosis?

The use of open standards to reach for interoperability on all levels should be the main driver for all policy making in the healtchare system regardless of country, region, hospital or clinic. And moving into patient engagement and health monitoring and consumer centric applications and services, this becomes even more obvious.

In a recent thesis “Standardization of interoperability in health care information systems“, (exec brief presentation) the different levels of interoperability was presented. Using Value Based Healthcare change in Sweden as background.

Interop Map

The results presented showed that without a good “Interoperability Climate” determined by sustainable resources and clear governance, the other interoperability levels will be problematic. With the bedrock being healthcare provisioning in Sweden, this could unfold to a better orchestrated interoperability practice, from Government, to the National Board of Health and Welfare, to local regional healthcare providers and hospitals, private clinics. As well as with citizen centric Health services, and consumer Health and Wellbeing apps on any platform. From policy makers, this implies that new policies should stress and enforce the use of open standards as a way to unleash the closed down data silos and practices.

In the future blog posts we will discuss semantic interoperability and technical interoperability, given that Findwise work in EC funded project, KConnect. And the final blog post will relate to information governance models, and why open standard uses make sense in the organisational interoperability domain.

This is a brief conversation with the students presenting their thesis. The first introduction is in Swedish (5-10min). The walk through of the thesis is in English.

 

Finding business values in the emerging digital workplace

How does one experience the promised business rewards of the emerging digital workplace (a.k.a the intranet)?

A group of renowned intranet professionals have taken on the task this question and offer sound practical advice as to how to achieve real business value in their new book “intranets that create business value” or in Swedish “intranät som skapar värde“,

intranat-som-skapar-varde-framsida

Today, in fact most days, end-users feel bewildered when using the intranet.It is to some extent impossible to navigate.There exists a hodgepodge of mixed user experiences, given that the intranet often serves as the access point to several tools. And findability too is low! With a coherent, smooth and interoperable workplace, users should be able to find information and data, peers and colleagues to solve their everyday tasks, in an efficient way…  anywhere, on any device and anytime.

The authors’ narrative describes how the intranet can best be used to produce beneficial business transformation, by including detailed chapters on: strategy, content & information architecture, search/findability, governance and stakeholder management, end-user engagement and adaptation. Measures and metrics are also included to qualify the sought after business values.

Findwise have contributed to the sections relating to organising principles. Put simply, it should be easy for a user to know where and how to contribute with information and content in a good manner, so that others are able to find and co-act on such codified knowledge.

Without sound and sustainable organising principles there will be no findability: shit in = shit out! Regardless of the technology platform employed for search or intranet

Buy the e-book today, in advance of the published printed version in May!

First Meteor Meetup this year

Yesterday we arranged a really successful Meetup to start this years Meteor activites.

This years first Meteor Meetup in Gothenburg -18 people showed up, more than expected and more than registered in beforehand on meetup.com – which is a first! So I can tell you that it was really successful already the beginning.

Pizza and beverages were served in Findwise Gothenburg office. Big thanks to Sebastian Ilves and Benjamin Lilland from Devkittens for helping out with arrangements.

We started up with a short presentation about what has happened in the community and in Gothenburg since last meetup last year. Here is the presentation with some newly added facts.

Then we carried on with demonstrations of some apps we have built at Findwise with Meteor, just mentioning a few:

  • Burnout – A search driven problem finder for websites using crawl-techniques and a search engine backend to deliver diagnostics to the Meteor front end application which handles user sessions and user specific data.
  • Keybox – A brilliant and quick app, which sprung out of a problem with key accesses on many different environment. The app helps out distributing access to servers for people just like you manage your keys in Github but for servers.
  • Signatures – Also a search driven app that helps Findwise staff to generate their email signatures by themselves, using the search to gather data from the company active directory.

Between a couple in-house app demonstrations we invited people from the community to demo what they have built or are working on.

Patrik Göthe first demoed an iPhone app built with Meteor to paint vectors with SVG almost like you paint with the pen tool in Photoshop and you can also change the background hue of the artboard your painting on. The original idea was to enable people to get nice colored background images for their phone, with a hue one could control just by the touch drag event.

Patrik demoed another application for people who do live coding. The app was reconfigured from being only a Meteor in the browser to being a desktop app. You can open code files and divide the code into chunks. In addition you can use this app in the background to help paste each part with a short command in the Mac when you are presenting and live coding a piece of software.

Andreas Rolén from GBG Startup Hack was here and demoed an app that can be used for hackathons or competitions. You can login to the app and adjust the teams and score etc from your phone, and updates would then be visible live on the website and on screens mounted in the hackathon location.

In total I think we got to see 10 apps demoed. As that wasn’t enough, Robin Lindh Nilsson and Johan Carlberg caught everyone’s attention when we all suddenly were playing their game on our own laptops and live on the TV. This was fun and exciting to say the least. Here’s a link to the game: http://globbyonline.diamonde.se/

Robin also demoed his conversion app that has been live for a while now – you can convert anything on this app: http://www.convertercentral.com/

Finally Mickaël Delaunay held a presentation about how you can in the best way publish your app on your own server, which was very professional and greatly done.

So thanks for this great meetup, I hope we see more like this soon again!

How it all began: a brief history of Intranet Search

In accordance to sources, the birth of the intranet fell on a 1994 – 1996, that was true prehistory from an IT systems point of view. Intranet history is bound up with the development of Internet – the global network. The idea of WWW, proposed in 1989 by Tim Berners-Lee and others, which aim was to enable the connection and access to many various sources, became the prototype for the first internal networks. The goal of intranet invention was to increase employees productivity through the easier access to documents, their faster circulation and more effective communication. Although, access to information was always a crucial matter, in fact, intranet offered lots more functionalities, i.e.: e-mail, group work support, audio-video communication, texts or personal data searching.

Overload of information

Over the course of the years, the content placed on WWW servers had becoming more important than other intranet components. First, managing of more and more complicated software and required hardware led to development of new specializations. Second, paradoxically the easiness of information printing became a source of serious problems. There was too much information, documents were partly outdated, duplicated, without homogeneous structure or hierarchy. Difficulties in content management and lack of people responsible for this process led to situation, when final user was not able to reach desired piece of information or this had been requiring too much effort.

Google to the rescue

As early as in 1998 the Gartner company made a document which described this state of Internet as a “Wild West”. In case of Internet, this problem was being solved by Yahoo or Google, which became a global leader on information searching. In internal networks it had to be improved by rules of information publishing and by CMS and Enterprise Search software. In many organizations the struggle for easier access to information is still actual, in the others – it has just began.

cowboys

And the Search approached

It was search engine which impacted the most on intranet perception. From one side, search engine is directly responsible for realization of basic assumptions of knowledge management in the company. From the other, it is the main source of complaints and frustration among internal networks users. There are many reasons of this status quo: wrong or unreadable searching results, lack of documents, security problems and poor access to some resources. What are the consequences of such situation? First and foremost, they can be observed in high work costs (duplication of tasks, diminution in quality, waste of time, less efficient cooperation) as well as in lost chances for business. It must not be forgotten that search engine problems often overshadow using of intranet as a whole.

How to measure efficiency?

In 2002 Nielsen Norman Group consultants estimated that productivity difference between employees using the best and the worst corporate network is about 43%. On the other hand, annual report of Enterprise Search and Findability Survey shows that in situation, when almost 60% of companies underline the high importance of information searching for their business, nearly as 45% of employees have problem with finding the information.
Leaving aside comfort and level of employees satisfaction, the natural effect of implementation and improvement of Enterprise Search solutions is financial benefit. Contrary to popular belief, investments profits and savings from reaching the information faster are completely countable. Preparing such calculations is not pretty easy. The first step is: to estimate time, which is spent by employees on searching for information, to calculate what percentage of quests end in a fiasco and how long does it take to perform a task without necessary materials. It should be pointed out that findings of such companies as IDC or AIIM shows that office workers set aside at least 15-35% of their working hours for searching necessary information.
Problems with searching are rarely connected with technical issues. Search engines, currently present on our market, are mature products, regardless of technologies type (commercial/open-source). Usually, it is always a matter of default installation and leaving the system in untouched state just after taking it “out of the box”. Each search engine is different because it deals with various documents collections. Another thing is that users expectations and business requirements are changing continually. In conclusion, ensuring good quality searching is an unremitting process.

Knowledge workers main tool?

Intranet has become a comprehensive tool used for companies goals accomplishment. It supports employees commitment and effectiveness, internal communication and knowledge sharing. However, its main task is to find information, which is often hide in stack of documents or dispersed among various data sources. Equipped with search engine, intranet has become invaluable working tool practically in all sectors, especially in specific departments as customer service or administration.

So, how is your company’s access to information?


This text makes an introduction to series of articles dedicated to intranet searching. Subsequent articles are intended to deal with: search engine function in organization, benefit from using Enterprise Search, requirements of searching information system, the most frequent errors and obstacles of implementations and systems architecture.

Using search technologies to create apps that even leaves Apple impressed

At Findwise we love to see how we can use the power of search technologies in ways that goes beyond the typical search box application.

One thing that has exploded the last few years is of course apps in smartphones and tablets. It’s no longer enough to store your knowledge in databases that are kept behind locked doors. Professionals of today want to have instant access to knowledge and information right where they are. Whether if it’s working at the factory floor or when showcasing new products for customers.

When you think of enterprise search today, you should consider it as a central hub of knowledge rather than just a classical search page on the intranet. Because when an enterprise search solution is in place, when information from different places have been normalized and indexed in one place, then there really are no limits for what you can do with the information.

By building this central hub of knowledge it’s simple to make that knowledge available for other applications and services within or outside of the organization. Smartphone and tablet applications is one great example.

Integrating mobile apps with search engine technologies works really well because of four reasons:

  • It’s fast. Search engines can find the right information using advanced queries or filtering options in a very short time, almost regardless of how big the index is.
  • It’s lightweight. The information handled by the device should only be what is needed by the device, no more, no less.
  • It’s easy to work with. Most search engine technologies provides a simple REST interface that’s easy to integrate with.
  • A unified interface for any content. If the content already is indexed by the enterprise search solution, then you use the same interface to access any kind of information.

We are working a lot together with SKF. A company that has transformed itself from a traditional industry company into a knowledge engineering company over the last years. I think it’s safe to say that Findwise have been a big part of that journey by helping them create their enterprise search solution.

And of course, since we love new challenges, we have also helped SKF create a few mobile apps. In particular there are two different apps that we have helped out with:

  • The shelf app, which is a portable product brochures archive. The main use case is quick and easy access to product information for sales reps when visiting customers.
  • The mobile product landing page, which is a mobile web app that you get to if you scan QR-codes printed on the package of SKF kits.

You can read more about the apps in our reference cases.

And this is something that haven’t gone unnoticed. In a speech by Tom Johnstone, the recent CEO of SKF, he mentions a “12% increase in productivity” for their sales force thanks to those smartphone and tablet apps.

And even more recently the tech giant Apple has noticed how the apps makes the day to day work of SKF employees easier and turned the apps created at SKF into major business reference cases for both their iPhone and iPads.

Stay Cleaning and moving boxes for cloud

This is the seventh post in a series (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) on the challenges organisations face as they move from having online content and tools hosted firmly on their estate to renting space in the cloud.  We will help you to consider the options and guide on the steps you need to take.

Starting from our first post we have covered different aspects you need to consider as you take each step including information structure and how it is managed using Office 365 and SharePoint as a technology example.  Planning for migration.

Moving Boxes

Do not even think about moving into the cloud apartment without a proper  cleaning of the content buckets. Moving from an architected household to a rented place, taxes a structured audit. Clean out all redundant, outdated and trivial matter (ROT). The very same habit you have cleaning up the attic when moving out from your old house.

It is also a good idea to decorate and add any features to your new cloud apartment before the content furniture is there.  It means the content will fit with any new design and adapt to any extra functionality with new features like windows and doors.  This can be done by reviewing and updating your publishing templates at the same time.  This will save time in the future.

Leaning upon the information governance standards, it should be easy to address the cleaning before moving, for all content owners who have been appointed to a set of collections or habitats. Most organisations could use a content vacuum cleaner, or rather use the search facilities and metric means to deliver up to date reports on:

  1. Active / in-Active habitats
  2. No clear ownership or the owner has left the building
  3. Metadata and link quality to content and collections to be moved across to the cloud apartments.
  4. Review publishing templates and update features or design to be used in the Cloud

When all active habitats and qualified content buckets have been revisited by their set of curators and information owners. The preparation and use of moving boxes, should be applied.

All moving boxes do need proper tagging, so that any moving company will be able to sort out where about the stuff should be placed in the new house, or building. For collections, and habitats, this means using the very same set of questions stated for adding a new habitat or collection to the cloud apartment house. Who, why, where and so forth, through the use of a structured workflow and form. When this first cleaning steps have been addressed, there should be automatic metadata enhancement, aligned with the information management processes to be used in the new cloud.

With decent resource descriptions and cleaned up content through the audit (ROT), this last step will auto-tag content based upon the business rules applied for the collection or habitat. Then been loaded into the content moving truck, or loading dock. Ready to added to the cloud.

All content that neither have proper assigned information ownership, or are in such a shape that migration can’t be done should persist on the estate or be archived or purged. This means that all metadata and links to either content bucket or habitat that won’t be moved in the first instances, should at least have correct and unique uri:s, address, to this content. And in the case a bucket or habitat have been run down by a demolition firm, purged. All inter-linkage to that piece of content or collection have to be changed.

This is typically a perfect quality report, to the information owners and content editors, that they need to work through prior to actually loading the content on the content dock.

Rubbish and Weed

Finally when all rotten data, deserted habitats and unmanageable buckets have been weeded out. It is time to prepare the moving truck, sending the content into its new destination.

Our final thread will cover how will the organisation and it habitants will be able to find content in this mix of clouds, and things left behind on the old estate? Cloud Search and Enterprise Search, seamless or a nightmare?

Please join our Live Stream on YouTube the 20th November 8.30AM – 10AM Central European Time
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Placemaking, wayfinding and game rules in the Clouds

This is the sixth post in a series (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7) on the challenges organisations face as they move from having online content and tools hosted firmly on their estate to renting space in the cloud.  We will help you to consider the options and guide on the steps you need to take.

Starting from our first post we have covered different aspects you need to consider as you take each step including information structure and how it is managed using Office 365 and SharePoint as a technology example.  We will cover more about SharePoint in this post, and placemaking in the cloud.
Funky Village
In SharePoint there are a set of logic chunks. One could decompose the digital workplace into intranet sites, as departmental and organisational buckets; team sites where groups collaborate, and lastly your personal domain being the my site collection. Navigating between these, is a mix of traditional information architecture and search driven content.  When being within a such a habitat as a teamsite, it is not always obvious how to cross-link or navigate to other domains within the digital workplace hosted in Sharepoint.

One way to overcome this, is to render different forms of portals, based upon dynamic navigation. These intersections and aggregates help users to move around the maze of buckets and collections of the content. Sharepoint have very good features, and options to create search-based content delivery mechanisms.

 A metadata and search-based content model, gives us cues for the future design of the digital workplace, with connected habitats and sustainable information architecture. Where people don’t get lost, and have wayfinding means to survive everyday work practices.

This is where how you manage the content in SharePoint and Office 365 is critical.  As we said in our first post it is important you have a good information architecture combined with a good governance framework that helps you to transform your buckets of content from the estate into the cloud.  We have covered information architecture so we now move more towards how governance completes the picture for you.

There are three approaches to the governance your organisation needs to have with SharePoint and Office 365.  You don’t have to use just one.  You can combine some of each to find the right blend for your organisation.  What works best for you will depend on a number of different factors.  Among them:

  • Restricting use – stopping some features from being used e.g. SharePoint Designer
  • Encouraging best practice – guidance and training available
  • Preventing problems – checking content before it is published

Each of these approaches can support your governance strategy.  The key is to understand what you need to use.

Restricting use

You need to be clear why your organisation is using SharePoint and Office 365 and the benefits expected.  This will shape how tight or loose your governance needs to be.

Once you are clear on this, you then need to consider the strategic benefits and drawbacks such as SharePoint Designer and site collection administration rights.

Benefits

  • You control what is being used.
  • You decide who uses a feature e.g. SharePoint Designer.
  • You manage the level of autonomy each site owner has.
  • You find out why someone needs to use a feature.
  • You monitor costs for licences, users, servers, etc.
  • You measure who is using what and why for reporting.

Drawbacks

  • You stifle innovation by not allowing people to test out ideas.
  • You stop legitimate use by asking for permission to use features.
  • You prevent people being able to share knowledge how they wish to.
  • You may be unable to realise the maximum potential of SharePoint.
  • You create unnecessary administration.
  • You risk adding costs without any value to offset them with.

You need to get the balance right with governance that gives you maximum value for the effort needed managing SharePoint and Office 365.

Encourage best practice

The goal from implementing SharePoint and Office 365 is to have an environment that enables employees to publish, share, find and use information easily to help with their work.  They are confident the information is reliable and appropriate, whatever their need for it is.  People also feel comfortable using these tools rather than alternative methods like calling helpdesks or emailing other employees for help.

Encouraging best practice by giving them the opportunity to test to meet their needs is one approach to achieving this.  There are factors you need to consider that can help or hinder the success of using this approach.

Benefits

  • You inform employees of all the benefits to be gained.
  • You train people to use the right tools.
  • You design a registration process to direct people to the right tools.
  • You point employees to guidance on how to follow best practice.
  • You encourage innovation by giving everyone freedom of use.

Drawbacks

  • You can’t prevent people using different tools to those you recommend.
  • You risk confusing employees using content unsure of its integrity.
  • You can’t prevent everyone ignoring best practice when publishing.
  • You may make it difficult for people to share knowledge effectively.
  • Your governance model may be ineffective and need improving.

Getting the balance right between encouraging best practice and the level of governance to deter behaviour which can destroy the value from using SharePoint and Office 365 is critical.

Preventing problems

As well as encouraging best practice, preventing problems helps to reduce time and costs wasted on sorting out unnecessary issues.  While that is the aim of most organisations the practical realities as it is rolled out can divert plans from achieving this.

You need to get the right level of governance in place to prevent problems.  Is it encouraging innovation and keeping governance light touch?  Is it a heavier touch to prevent the ‘wrong’ behaviour and minimise risk of your brand and reputation being damaged?  How much do you want to spend preventing problems?  What does your cost/benefit analysis show?

Benefits

  • People using SharePoint and Office 365 have a great experience (especially the first time they use it).
  • Everyone is confident they can use it for what they need it for without experience problems.
  • Employees don’t waste time calling the helpdesk because many problems have been prevented.
  • Effective governance encourages early adoption and increased knowledge sharing.
  • Costs spent preventing problems are justified by increased productivity and reduced risk of errors.

Drawbacks

  • People find registering difficult and lengthy because of extra steps taken to prevent problems and don’t bother.
  • People find it too restrictive for their needs and it stifles innovation.
  • People turn to other tools (maybe not approved) to meet their needs and ask other people for help to use them.
  • Too restrictive governance prevents most beneficial use by raising the barrier too high for people to use.
  • Costs of preventing problems are higher than benefits to be gained and not justified.

You need to consider the potential benefits and drawbacks before deciding on the level of governance that is right for your organisation.

Remember, it is possible and probably desirable to have different levels of governance for each feature.  It may be lighter for personal views and opinions expressed in MyProfile and MySite but tighter for policies and formal news items in TeamSites.

That is the challenge!  You have so much flexibility to configure the tools to meet your organisation’s needs.  Don’t be afraid to test out on part of your intranet to see what effect it has and involve employees to feed back on their experience before launching it.

The way forward is to create a sustainable information architecture, that supports an information environment that is available on any platform, everywhere, anytime and on any device.  A governance  framework can show roles and responsibilities, how they fit with a strategy and plan with publishing standards as the foundation to a consistently good user experience.

Combining a governance framework and information architecture with the same scope avoids any gaps in your buckets of content being managed or not being found.  It helps you transform from your estate to the cloud successfully.

In our last concluding posts we will dive into more design oriented topics with a helping hand from findability experts and developers. Adding migration thoughts in next post. But first navigating the social graph being people centric, leaving some outstanding questions. How will the graph interoperate if your business runs several clouds, and still have buckets of content elsewhere?

Please join our Live Stream on YouTube the 20th November 8.30AM – 10AM Central European Time
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View Mark Morrell's LinkedIn profileMark Morell intranet-pioneer

Content Governance – life cycle and reach

This is the fifth post in a series (1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7 ) on the challenges organisations face as they move from having online content and tools hosted firmly on their estate to renting space in the cloud.  We will help you to consider the options and guide on the steps you need to take.

 Starting from our first post we have covered different aspects you need to consider as you take each step including information structure and how it is managed using Office 365 and SharePoint as a technology example.  We will cover governance and how content should be managed in the cloud in this post.

content buckets

Content created within a context, as either a departmental site, or team habitat has usually only reach and bearing for the local context of fellow members of staff within this unit. Other pieces of content have a coverage that stretches all parts of the business. One simple example, is the bucket of content that makes up the management system, with governing principles, strategies, policies and guidelines that describes the core processes, activities, roles and so forth within an organisation.

Yet other content, as the outcome from a project, will build a bucket of content that either lives in a new context, improves a bucket of content or feeds into yet another following project.

From an information management perspective, it is vital that you have organising principles to all your content, where all these layers have been covered. Both reach, and the life cycle to the set of content.

You need a governance framework that reaches out to every bucket of content.  This covers what is still on your estate as well as the growing amount in the cloud.  All content needs to be managed to remove risks of leakage of sensitive information and prevent people having an inconsistent user experience as they move from one bucket of content in the cloud to another content bucket still on the estate.

You need to make sure people do not see the difference between buckets of content on the estate from content buckets in the cloud.  People using your content to help with their work don’t need to know where the content is kept.  They need to find it as easily as before, preferably even easier!  Content in the cloud  should feel the same and be a natural extension to the digital environment people are already used to.  Manage it with a governance framework that covers every bucket of content and make it more easy to adopt quicker and use more often without caution or delay.

Part of your governance needs to cover publishing standards based on business needs so it is easy to access from any device e.g laptops, tablets and smartphones, and to view without unnecessary authentication levels.  This helps to create that consistent good user experience that encourages people to use your content whether the bucket is in the cloud or not.

A professional team from group HR, might work in their local teamsite, with on-going conversations, work-in-progress documents and so forth. Pieces of their content production leads to governing policies that have a global reach within the organisation, and needs to be linked from the corporate intranet spaces. with versioning and good quality to resource descriptions (meta data). This practice and professional network of HR people, do also share content on a departmental site. With links and resources, that have direct impact on their internal processes. The group of people, have outreaching triggers, and in-bound conversations. And have to balance these two states.

When it comes to temporal content buckets, like a project team site. There are several considerations one have to capture. First where will the outcome and result be stored, when the project is finished. In which context will these content pieces contribute. Second, what should be captured from all on-going conversations (social elements) and work-in-progress and drafts developed during the projects lifecycle? Should a project habitat, be searchable after closing down? Or do the habitat change status, hence all documentation stay within the collection, but the overarching state to the habitat changes? Within Sharepoint these temporal states, versions, workflow and properties. All sum up the organising principles.

If these principles haven’t been ironed out, and been described and decided. Inevitable there will be emerging ghost towns, of dead habitats and lost collections of content. With no governance or ownership whatsoever. All this will become a digital landfill.

We will cover more about SharePoint in our next post in this series. Please visit Michael Sampson‘s recent slides where he takes you through strategy, planning, governance and user adoption for collaboration!
Please join our Live Stream on YouTube the 20th November 8.30AM – 10AM Central European Time
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The Curator – how to cultivate the habitat

This is the fourth post in a series (1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7) on the challenges organisations face as they move from having online content and tools hosted firmly on their estate to renting space in the cloud.  We will help you to consider the options and guide on the steps you need to take.

In the first post we set out the most common challenges you are likely to face and how you may overcome these.  In the second post we focused on how Office 365 and SharePoint can play a part in moving to the cloud.  In the third post we covered how they can help join up your organisation online using their collaboration tools and features.

In this post we will cover engagement and how sorting and categorisation of artifacts, according to a simple-to-understand and easy-to-use standard, will form the bits and parts of the curation and cultivation process.

CultivationAll document libraries should have one standard listing of all items – with two very distinct audiences: being either actors within the habitat or the people contributing, acting and joining the daily conversation; and secondly, those visitors who pass-by the habitat to collect, link and act upon the content presented within the habitats realm.

This makes it very easy for visitors to find their way around a habitat, if the visitors’ area (business lounge) is pretty much aligned to the overarching theme of the site… and all artifacts that the project team like to share wider, have been listed in a virtual bookshelf, with major versions only. The visitors’ area, has all the relevant data, presented upfront. Basically the answers to the questions set when starting the project. The visitors’ area shouldn’t be a backdrop, but rather a storefront. The content has to be of good quality. Then there should be options to engage with the inner-living-room of the habitat, and enter the messy on-going conversations, depending on access-rights. But the default setting, should always be open for unexpected “internal” (within the realm of the organisation) visitors. If the visitors’ area is compiled in a nice and easy to use manner, most visitors are just happy to pick the best-read from the bookshelf, or at least raise a questions for the team! The social construct for this is “welcoming a stranger”, since that visitor might link to your team’s content, cross-linking into his social-spaces.

The habitat’s livingroom and social conversations, will address new context-specific organising principles. A team might want to add new list-items, sort categories or introduce very local what-goes-where themes. This may be especially so when the team consists of actors who have different roles and responsibilities with regard to the overall outcome. And because of this, there may be a certain mix of tools or services in this one habitat of many, where they hang-out for project tasks.

The contextual adjustment is where the curator has to work on a cultivation process that glues the team together. The shared terminology within a group conversation, is what match their practices together. At inception, the curator picks a bouquet of on-topic terms from the controlled vocabularies. Mixing this with everyday use, and contributions from all members, this can be the fruitful and semantically-enhanced conversations with end-user generated tags or “folksonomies”. The same goes for interior design of links, tools, chosen content types and other forms of artifacts that the team will be needing to fulfill their goals and outcome.

The governance of the habitat, leans very much on the shared experiences in the group, and assigned responsibilities for stewardship and curation – where publishing standards, guidelines and training should be part of the mix.

We will cover more on governance and how content should be managed in the cloud in our next post.
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Housekeeping rules within the Habitat

This is the third post in a series (1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7) on the challenges organisations face as they move from having online content and tools hosted firmly on their estate to renting space in the cloud.  We will help you to consider the options and guide on the steps you need to take.

 In the first post we set out the most common challenges you are likely to face and how you may overcome these.  In the second post we focused on how Office 365 and SharePoint can play a part in moving to the cloud.  Here we cover how they can help join up your organisation online using their collaboration tools and features.

Habitat

When arranging the habitat, it is key to address the theme of collaboration. Since each of these themes, derives different feature settings of artifacts and services. In many cases, teamwork is situated in the context of a project. Other themes for collaboration are the line of business unit teamwork, or the more learning networks a.k.a communities of practice. I will leave these later themes for now.

Most enterprises have some project management process (i.e. PMP) that all projects do have to adhere to, with added complementary documentation, and reporting mechanisms. This is so the leadership within the organisation will be able to align resources, govern the change portfolio across different business units. Given this structure, it is very easy to depict measurable outcomes, as project documents have to be produced, regardless of what the project is supposed to contribute towards.

The construction of a habitat, or design of a joint workplace, all boils down to pragmatic steps that are aligned with the overarching project framework at hand. Answering a few simple Questions (Inverted Pyramid):

  • Who? will be participating, who will own (organisation) the outcome from the joint effort pulling together a project (dc.contributor ; dc.creator ; dc.provenance ) and reach ( dc.coverage ; dc.audience )
  • What? is the project all about, topic and theme (dc.subject ; dc.title ; dc.description, dc.type )
  • When? will this project be running, and timeline for ending the project. All temporal themes around the life of a project. (dc.date)
  • Where? will participants contribute. What goes where and why? (dc.source ; dc.format ; dc.identifier )
  • Why? usually defined in project description, setting common ground for the goals and expected outcome. ( dc.description )
  • How? defines used processes, practices and tools to create the expected outcome for the project, with links to common resources as the PMP framework, but also links to other key data-sets. Like ERP record keeping and masterdata, for project number and other measures not stored in the habitat, but still pillars to align to the overarching model. (dc.relation)

When these questions have been answered, the resource description for the habitat is set. In Sharepoint the properties bag (code) feature. During the lifespan of the on-going project, all contribution, conversations and creation of things can inherit rule-based metadata for the artifacts from the collections resource description. This reduces the burden weighing on the actors building the content, by enabling automagic metadata completion where applicable. And from the wayfinding, and findability within and between habitats, these resource descriptions will be the building blocks for a sustainable information architecture.

In our next post we will cover how to encourage employee engagement with your content.

Please join our Live Stream on YouTube the 20th November 8.30AM – 10AM Central European Time
View Fredric Landqvist's LinkedIn profileFredric Landqvist research blog
View Mark Morrell's LinkedIn profileMark Morell intranet-pioneer